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  • .....this program also opened a secret door for me to have an excellent culture exchange experience...said Amal
  • “We are a community museum, and we interact with the community,” Meguid said.
  • For a couple of days, I did not want to open my e-mail again.....said Rafaat
  • From the very beginning, I was embraced and taken care of by anyone and everyone involved in the grant ..... Shawn said
  • Generalizations about America are as evil and sinister as generalizations about Arabs and Muslims...said Mustapha
  • In my point of view, language and culture cannot be separated... Hassan said.
  • I just started to modify (my students’) exhibition, to modify the picture in their mind, and I think I was able to do that..... Daowd said.

  • .....this program also opened a secret door for me to have an excellent culture exchange experience...said Amal, 6/17/2008
    "Have as your goal to do your best and to make a difference. We are in the world to make a difference, and everything we do changes the world." Said Oliver Wendell Holmes. My experience for being a Fulbrighter in North Carolina in 2007/2008 has completely changed my social and academic life as it created new ways and perspectives to interact with the American society in different ways.

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    Dr. Amal Mostafa with K-12 students
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    “We are a community museum, and we interact with the community,” Meguid said., 6/16/2008
    ASWAN, Egypt — The Nubia Museum sits on a hill just up from the floating line of cruise ships moored on the Nile River. Inside the museum’s yellow sandstone walls works an enthusiastic man with a Boston connection, some 6,000 miles away from this southern Egyptian city. His name is Ossama Abdel Meguid, the founding director of the world’s only museum devoted solely to Nubia.

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    For a couple of days, I did not want to open my e-mail again.....said Rafaat, 2/13/2008
    Mohamed Raafat says he found out about his admission to one of the most prestigious universities in the world by means of a one-line e-mail message that had no subject line: "Congratulations," the message read, "you''ve been accepted to MIT." The underwhelming way in which he received that notice hardly reflects the reasons the Massachusetts Institute of Technology wanted him. Mr. Raafat is among the first batch of 29 foreign students to receive the International Fulbright Science and Technology Award. Born in Egypt and a recipient of undergraduate and master''s degrees from Cairo University, Mr. Raafat was the only successful applicant in a highly competitive pool of 32 Egyptians who tried for the Fulbright Ph.D. award.

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    From the very beginning, I was embraced and taken care of by anyone and everyone involved in the grant ..... Shawn said, 2/10/2008

    As an American Fulbright Scholar, I had the great opportunity to spend the past semester living and conducting research in Cairo, Egypt. Project and travel support were a joint venture by the United States Department of State and the Egyptian Government that was coordinated by the Binational Fulbright Commission in Egypt. Hosted by the Egyptian Government’s National Research Center’s Air Pollution Department, and individually by Dr. Abdel-Hameed, I was in Cairo to set up the project “Potential Public Health Impact of Rural and Urban Residential Indoor Bioaerosols in Egypt.” However, this adventure did not begin or end last semester.

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    Generalizations about America are as evil and sinister as generalizations about Arabs and Muslims...said Mustapha, 1/28/2008
    Man is the enemy of the unknown, so says an Arab proverb. As a student of English, I am a big fan of Hollywood movies. Those movies have, for the most part, shaped my perceptions of America. I believed, as many Arabs still believe, that all American men are violent, drunk, immoral, irreligious, and promiscuous and all American women are loose. The American government and the American people are one and the same. It was not before I came here through Fulbright’s semester-long interfaith program that many facts unfolded, many stereotypes vanished, and many horizons opened.

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    In my point of view, language and culture cannot be separated... Hassan said., 1/28/2008
    “The most exciting thing about this matter is that American people will know more and more about my country, my people and my culture,” Hassan said. “To add to this, it is a great opportunity to be in the United States of America in order to be a good ambassador of the United States of America when I come back to my country.” Hassan is teaching in Reno thanks to a unique intersection between the missions of the U.S. Department of State’s Fulbright Program, which is designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and those of other countries, as well as the Northern Nevada International Center (NNIC). The NNIC works to build bridges of understanding between the people of Reno and people from other places. Carina Black, director of NNIC, explained the relationship and why Hassan has come to Reno. Among other things, NNIC introduces language classes where there is an expressed interest, need and niche. The center operates after-school programs in 20 local schools for all interested community members. "Many students came to me and asked why the University didn’t offer an Arabic language class,” Black said. “That went on for so long that I finally said, ‘All right, I’m going to do something about it."

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    I just started to modify (my students’) exhibition, to modify the picture in their mind, and I think I was able to do that..... Daowd said., 1/28/2008
    Changing viewpoints In his office, a small, plain room in Reynolds Gym, Daowd’s computer sits on his desk, the screen displaying Demon Deacon wallpaper. The office is empty but for some memories from home that he has used in class and a Mother Goose storybook that a professor gave to him. Daowd shows traditional Egyptian clothing, CDs, posters and pamphlets of Egyptian monuments he has brought from home. He is obviously proud of his heritage, and his bright, characteristic smile and contagious laugh show that he is happy to share it with Americans and wants to answer students’ questions about his culture. “They do want to know about Islam because people here, I think they have a bad idea about Islam,” Daowd said of his students’ curiosity. “They think that just we’re terrorists and extremists, but actually, you know, Muslim means ‘peace,’ ‘peaceful man.’” He said that the few Muslims who commit terrorist attacks are the exception to the rule, although they give all Muslims a bad reputation. “I just started to modify (my students’) exhibition, to modify the picture in their mind, and I think I was able to do that,” Daowd said. Similarly, Daowd said that before he came to the United States, he did not like Americans. However, he has since realized that it is important to separate the American people from the American government, and to not judge one based on the other. “So I began, from myself, to change the picture of the American people,” he said.

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